Healthy Kids Community Challenge Leeds and Grenville

Children pulling leeks

Veggie of the Week Blog

Week 4

Cucumber written on a chalkboard sign

Hi everyone! Welcome to our veggie (& fruit) of the week blog. This week we are going to talk about CUCUMBERS.

Did You Know?!

In Ontario we grow two types of cucumbers:

  1. Greenhouse cucumbers. These grown year-round and do not grow in soil. They are often grown in a special material called Rockwool which holds water really well!
  2. Field cucumbers. These are available between June and October and are grown in soil.
Trivia Time!

One of the main vitamins in cucumbers is:

  1. Vitamin K
  2. Vitamin D
  3. Vitamin C

Answer: C - Cucumbers are a source of Vitamin C.

Let’s Get Cookin’!

Now that you have learned about cucumbers, it’s time for us to share a recipe with you! This is one of the HKCC team’s favourite cucumber recipes (shown in the photo above):

Cool ‘n’ Crispy Cucumber Salad
Serves 2

Ingredients:

Directions:

Food Safety Alert!

Wash hands (with warm soapy water), fruit, veggies, counter tops and utensils before you start preparing food and between tasks.

Keep cold foods at 4°C or lower and store in a sealed container.

For more information on food safety at home visit: The Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit's website.

References:

Foodland Ontario. (2017). Kid’s Corner: Onions. Retrieved from: https://www.ontario.ca/foodland/page/cucumbers

Week 3

Rhubarb written on a chalkboard sign

This week on our veggie (& fruit) of the week blog we are learning about RHUBARB.

Did You Know?!

It wasn't until around the year 1778 that rhubarb became appreciated for its fruit-like quality – before this it was used for medicinal purposes.
Something unique about rhubarb is that it is available during times of the year when many other fruit are not.
It is also quite hearty and easy to grow, making it a great go-to for someone who might be newer to gardening.

Trivia Time!

This nutrient is most commonly known for being in bananas, but did you know you can find it in rhubarb, too? What nutrient is it?

  1. Iron
  2. Sodium
  3. Potassium

Answer: C – Rhubarb is a source of potassium, just like bananas.

Let’s Get Cookin’!

This combination of rhubarb, orange juice, oats, milk and maple syrup really works well. This is a delicious oatmeal recipe to enjoy year-round!

Rocking Rhubarb and Orange Oatmeal
Serves 2

Ingredients:

Directions:

TIP: You can make this oatmeal in advance so all you have to do is heat it up when you want to enjoy it! Separate the oatmeal into containers, let it cool, and then store in covered containers in the fridge for up to 4 days.

Food Safety Alert!

Wash hands (with warm soapy water), fruit, veggies, counter tops and utensils before you start preparing food and between tasks! (see below)

Keep cold foods at 4°C or lower and store in a sealed container.

For more information on food safety at home visit: The Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit's website.

References:

Eating Well. (2017). Oatmeal-Rhubarb Porridge. Retrieved from: http://www.eatingwell.com/recipe/250267/oatmeal-rhubarb-porridge/

Foodland Ontario. (2017). Rhubarb. Retrieved from: https://www.ontario.ca/foodland/food/rhubarb

Week 2

Welcome back to our veggie (& fruit) of the week blog. This week we are learning about ONIONS!

Did You Know?!

There are many different types of onions that are available year round. They are great because they can be used in a lot of different recipes: stir fries, salads, soups, sauces, sandwiches – the list never ends!

Helpful tip: To prevent "onion tears", try running the onion under cold water while peeling the outer layer off.  You can also try freezing the onion for about 20 minutes before cutting it or wearing a pair of “kitchen goggles”!

Trivia Time!

This is the compound in onions that makes our eyes water:

  1. Calcium
  2. Hydrogen
  3. Sulphur

Answer: C – The sulphuric compounds in onions are released when you cut into them and that is what makes our eyes tear up.

Let’s Get Cookin’!

In this video, Danielle from our HKCC team shows two different ways to chop an onion. Take a look!

Food Safety Alert!

Wash hands (with warm soapy water), fruit, veggies, counter tops and utensils before you start preparing food and between tasks!

Keep cold foods at 4°C or lower and store in a sealed container.

For more information on food safety at home visit: The Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit's website.

References:

Foodland Ontario. (2017). Kid’s Corner: Onions. Retrieved from: https://www.ontario.ca/foodland/page/onions

Week 1

Sweet potato written on a chalkboard sign

Hi everyone and Happy Spring! For our first series in our veggie (& fruit) of the week blog, we are going to be learning about SWEET POTATOES.

Did You Know?!

Sweet potatoes are commonly found growing right here in Ontario. You can find them growing along the north shores of Lake Erie – cool! We love bright veggies and fruit, and the sweet potato’s bright orange flesh is certainly colourful; this means it is loaded with nutrition.

Let’s Get Cookin’!

While sweet potatoes can be enjoyed in many ways (roasted, boiled, or steamed, mashed or baked as fries), one unique way to use them is in a smoothie! The HKCC team loves this yummy banana sweet potato smoothie.

Banana Sweet Potato Smoothie
Serves 2

Ingredients:

Directions:

Food Safety Alert!

Wash hands (with warm, soapy water), fruits, veggies, counter tops and utensils before you start preparing food and between tasks!

Keep cold foods at 4°C or lower and store in a sealed container.

For more information on food safety at home, visit: The Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit's website.

References

Foodland Ontario. (2017). Sweet Potatoes. Retrieved from: https://www.ontario.ca/foodland/food/sweet-potatoes